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Our Research

An important part of our work is understanding and challenging the social elements that impact suicide.

Lifeline Research and Reports

Lifeline Research Foundation creates new knowledge, as well as engaging in public education, awareness building and advocacy in relation to suicide prevention. One of the Foundation’s key functions is to conduct research that informs the development of effective, evidence-based programs to support Lifeline’s vision for an Australia free of suicide. The systematic process of research ‘translation’, or implementation science, creates an essential link between research and practical outcomes for people seeking help and crisis supporters. All the Foundation’s projects receive input from academic partners and Lifeline’s Lived Experience Advisory Group.

This review summarises the emerging research and knowledge, key themes and principles surrounding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural perspectives and concepts of healing and social and emotional wellbeing as they relate to suicide prevention.
Identified gaps and recommendations towards achieving an Australia free of suicide.
The Lifeline Research Foundation partnered with La Trobe University with the support of ACON and QLife to increase understanding of needs, motivators, and barriers that currently affect LGBTI+ peoples’ uptake of crisis support services.

This Australian first study found that 71% of LGTBI+ Australians did not reach out to services, such as Lifeline, for help during their most recent personal or mental health crisis.
Lifeline Australia is one of several active suicide prevention hotlines from around the world that contributed to this global recommendation report from the World Health Organisation.
The Bridging Hope Charity Foundation partnered with the Lifeline Research Foundation and DiverseWerks to establish the feasibility of a Chinese language Lifeline service in Australia. The project explored the need for such a service within the Chinese Australian community, as well as cultural appropriateness for delivery of mental health and wellbeing support services and activities, in particular suicide prevention supports.
The Lifeline Research Foundation, with generous funding support from Servier Australia, commissioned a comprehensive research project on frequent callers, which was undertaken by University of Melbourne researchers, and completed in 2015. This report summarises the findings from this research and raises questions for consideration about service improvement for Lifeline.
Produced by the National Coalition for Suicide Prevention and Suicide Prevention Australia. Lifeline Australia is a contributor to this research plan.
Produced by the National Coalition for Suicide Prevention and Suicide Prevention Australia. Lifeline Australia is a contributor to this research plan.
This study records the value of Lifeline Online Crisis Support Chat, with research findings showing generally that consumers/visitors to the service experience a decrease in personal distress, increased sense of belonging and able to seek help, and greater confidence in dealing with crisis issues. The service attracts people who would not use other services. Using Social Return on Investment analysis, the study estimates that for every dollar required to operate this service, there is a return to the community valued at $8.40.
The National Coalition for Suicide Prevention offers this perspective on the global WHO suicide prevention report, focusing on areas where Australia is leading the way,and where significant work is required to improve outcomes for the community.
The first WHO report aiming to increase awareness of the public health significance of suicide and suicide attempts, to make suicide prevention a higher priority on the global public health agenda, and to encourage and support countries to develop or strengthen comprehensive suicide prevention strategies in a multisectoral public health approach.
This research clearly shows helplines playing a part in the help seeking of males with emerging mental health issues – and therefore builds the case for helplines being seen as accessible points of contact and service pathways within the wider mental health system
This report outlines the activities of the Lifeline Research Foundation for 2014. It summarizes major research projects and the translation of research findings into service improvements. The Foundation also advocates for policy and program reform towards an Australia free of suicide.
This report outlines the activities of the Lifeline Research Foundation for 2013. It summarises major research projects and the translation of research findings into service improvements. The Foundation also advocates for policy and program reform towards an Australia free of suicide.
This Discussion Paper reflects the issues and questions raised in a Roundtable hosted by the Lifeline Foundation in June 2012 on the general topic of Telehealth and Mental Health in Australia.
This Discussion Paper reflects the issues and questions raised in a Roundtable hosted by the Lifeline Foundation in June 2012 on the general topic of What Makes a Suicide Prevention Strategy Work?
The purpose of this paper is to inform and hopefully promote productive discussion and planning about how helplines can become known for service excellence in providing crisis support.
This report summarises the research evidence on the effectiveness of telephone crisis lines in reducing suicide.
Lifeline has been providing services to people experiencing personal crisis for more than 50 years. This Position Statement describes the research evidence and theory behind Lifeline Services.
This is a complete ‘how to’ guide on Suicide Bereavement Support Group planning, operation and maintenance. The Practice Handbook includes background on the research evidence base surrounding support groups for those who are bereaved by suicide and resources for further reference.
Analysis of a sample of Lifeline 13 11 14 call data in 2008/2009 highlights a number of serious crisis support issues that are addressed by this service. It demonstrates that vulnerable high risk groups such as those who are suicidal, socially isolated and experiencing mental illness are being supported through Lifeline’s 13 11 14 service.
The Senate Inquiry into Suicide in Australia is welcomed as an opportunity to review the current situation and identify steps for improvement. Lifeline believes more can be done on this major social and health issue in Australia.
This Lifeline Suicide Prevention Strategy is intended to inform Lifeline and stakeholders regarding our suicide prevention work and our vision for a suicide safer future.